Knowledge and belief
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Knowledge and belief an introduction to the logic of the two notions. by Jaakko Hintikka

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Published by Cornell University Press. in Ithaca [New York], London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesCornell"s Contemporary Philosophy Series
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20073232M

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Mar 15,  · ‘Knowledge and Christian Belief’ (KCB) is not a book that many Christians would be interested in, or, frankly, want or need. Plantinga is a top-notch Christian philosopher: you won’t find a self-help style or run-of-the-mill, feel-good book among his works/5. Knowledge, Belief, and Character: Readings in Contemporar and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device kauainenehcp.com: Guy Axtell. Nov 01,  · The thrust of Plantinga’s argument in Knowledge and Christian Belief is that, because we (all humans, presumably) believe that God must be real when we look at the world in an immediate (basic) way – not because we look at the world and then reason to the conclusion, but because we believe it immediately upon experiencing the world – then. So, presumably, knowledge of (say) Theaetetus consists in true belief about Theaetetus plus an account of what differentiates Theaetetus from every other human. Socrates offers two objections to this proposal. First, if knowledge of Theaetetus requires a mention of his sêmeion, so does true belief about.

In philosophy, the study of knowledge is called epistemology; the philosopher Plato famously defined knowledge as "justified true belief", though this definition is now thought by some analytic philosophers [citation needed] to be problematic because of the Gettier . Belief is the attitude that something is the case or true. In epistemology, philosophers use the term "belief" to refer to personal attitudes associated with true or false ideas and concepts. However, "belief" does not require active introspection and circumspection. For example, few ponder whether the sun will rise, just assume it will. Oct 30,  · This book is meant as a layman’s version of Plantinga’s much longer and more technical book Warranted Christian Belief. and so it is possible that some of my criticisms are addressed in the more thorough treatise. Here I will only be taking the shorter book into consideration. Chapter 1: Can We Speak and Think About God? Knowledge and Belief An Introduction to the Logic of the Two Notions by Jaakko Hintikka Prepared by Vincent F. Hendricks & John Symons In Jaakko Hintikka published Knowledge and Belief: An Introduction to the Logic of the Two Notions with Cornell University Press.4/5.

"Alvin Plantinga's Warranted Christian Belief is a landmark book on the rationality of Christian belief This splendid shorter rendering of that book's proposals makes them accessible to general readers and to students outside the field of philosophy. It is a total pleasure to welcome this version of his seminal kauainenehcp.com: Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company. This book has been cited by the following publications. belief, truth and knowledge. Professor Armstrong offers a dispositional account of general beliefs and of knowledge of general propositions. Belief about particular matters of fact are described as structures in the mind of the believer which represent or 'map' reality, while general Cited by: ThriftBooks sells millions of used books at the lowest everyday prices. We personally assess every book's quality and offer rare, out-of-print treasures. We deliver the joy of reading in % recyclable packaging with free standard shipping on US orders over $ Knowledge and Christian Belief is a pleasure to read and will serve as an excellent and engaging introduction to Plantinga’s most influential ideas about the rationality of religious belief. —Michael Rea, professor of philosophy, University of Notre Dame.